One Bedroom Apartments for Rent

Updated - May 26, 2017
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Fri, May 26 10:00am - 4:00pm
$5,320
1BR, 1BA at 808 Columbus Avenue
Fri, May 26 10:00am - 5:00pm
$5,700
1BR, 1BA at 808 Columbus Avenue
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$3,325
1BR, 1BA at 247 N 7th Street
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1 Bedroom, Williamsburg Rental in NYC for $3,070 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Williamsburg Rental in NYC for $3,070 - Photo 2
Posted 6 mins ago
Williamsburg, Northern Brooklyn, Brooklyn
$3,070
Per Month
By Thomas Tuminello
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Exclusive · No Fee · Elevator
1 Bedroom, NoLita Rental in NYC for $3,113 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, NoLita Rental in NYC for $3,113 - Photo 2
Posted 8 mins ago
NoLita, Downtown Manhattan, Manhattan
$3,113
Per Month
By Paloma Cacho-Sousa
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No Fee · Laundry in Unit · Hardwood Floors
1 Bedroom, Astoria Rental in NYC for $2,485 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Astoria Rental in NYC for $2,485 - Photo 2
Posted 19 mins ago
Astoria, Northwestern Queens, Queens
$2,485
Per Month
By Gerard Murrell
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Exclusive · No Fee · 750 ft²
1 Bedroom, Turtle Bay Rental in NYC for $3,475 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Turtle Bay Rental in NYC for $3,475 - Photo 2
Posted 8 mins ago
Turtle Bay, Midtown East, Midtown Manhattan, Manhattan
$3,475
Per Month
Midtown East Expert
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No Fee · Doorman · Elevator · Laundry in Unit · Pre-War · Hardwood Floors
1 Bedroom, Lincoln Square Rental in NYC for $3,750 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Lincoln Square Rental in NYC for $3,750 - Photo 2
Posted 9 mins ago
Lincoln Square, Upper West Side, Upper Manhattan, Manhattan
$3,750
Per Month
Upper West Side Expert
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No Fee · Doorman · Elevator · Laundry in Unit
1 Bedroom, Manhattan Valley Rental in NYC for $5,700 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Manhattan Valley Rental in NYC for $5,700 - Photo 2
Posted 9 mins ago
Manhattan Valley, Upper West Side, Upper Manhattan, Manhattan
$5,700
Per Month
By Columbus Square Leasing Team
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Open House:  Fri, May 26, 10:00am - 5:00pm
Exclusive · No Fee · Doorman · Elevator
1 Bedroom, Hunters Point Rental in NYC for $3,295 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Hunters Point Rental in NYC for $3,295 - Photo 2
Posted 9 mins ago
Hunters Point, Long Island City, Northwestern Queens, Queens
$3,295
Per Month
Long Island City Expert
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No Fee · Doorman · Elevator · Hardwood Floors
1 Bedroom, Hell's Kitchen Rental in NYC for $3,210 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Hell's Kitchen Rental in NYC for $3,210 - Photo 2
Posted 8 mins ago
Hell's Kitchen, Midtown Manhattan, Manhattan
$3,210
Per Month
By Rafael Bitton
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No Fee · Doorman · Elevator · Laundry in Unit · Hardwood Floors
1 Bedroom, Hell's Kitchen Rental in NYC for $3,750 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Hell's Kitchen Rental in NYC for $3,750 - Photo 2
Posted 8 mins ago
Hell's Kitchen, Midtown Manhattan, Manhattan
$3,750
Per Month
By Bhenisha Bantawa
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Pre-War
1 Bedroom, Chelsea Rental in NYC for $2,799 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Chelsea Rental in NYC for $2,799 - Photo 2
Posted 9 mins ago
Chelsea, Midtown Manhattan, Manhattan
$2,799
Per Month
By Russell Dinstein
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1 Bedroom, East Village Rental in NYC for $3,095 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, East Village Rental in NYC for $3,095 - Photo 2
Posted 9 mins ago
East Village, Downtown Manhattan, Manhattan
$3,095
Per Month
By 9300 Realty
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No Fee · Pre-War · Hardwood Floors
1 Bedroom, Gramercy Park Rental in NYC for $3,000 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Gramercy Park Rental in NYC for $3,000 - Photo 2
Posted 35 mins ago
Gramercy Park, Midtown Manhattan, Manhattan
$3,000
Per Month
Gramercy Park Expert
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No Fee · 800 ft² · Doorman · Elevator
1 Bedroom, Chelsea Rental in NYC for $3,933 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Chelsea Rental in NYC for $3,933 - Photo 2
Posted 9 mins ago
Chelsea, Midtown Manhattan, Manhattan
$3,933
Per Month
By Shin Berkowitz
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No Fee · 740 ft² · Doorman · Elevator · Hardwood Floors
1 Bedroom, Upper East Side Rental in NYC for $2,699 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Upper East Side Rental in NYC for $2,699 - Photo 2
Posted 8 mins ago
Upper East Side, Upper Manhattan, Manhattan
$2,699
Per Month
By Douglas Croland
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1 Bedroom, Lincoln Square Rental in NYC for $3,401 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Lincoln Square Rental in NYC for $3,401 - Photo 2
Posted 8 mins ago
Lincoln Square, Upper West Side, Upper Manhattan, Manhattan
$3,401
Per Month
By Valerie Obregon
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No Fee · Doorman · Elevator · Hardwood Floors
1 Bedroom, Financial District Rental in NYC for $3,070 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Financial District Rental in NYC for $3,070 - Photo 2
Posted 8 mins ago
Financial District, Downtown Manhattan, Manhattan
$3,070
Per Month
By Jeffrey Carlson
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Exclusive · No Fee · Doorman · Elevator
1 Bedroom, Crown Heights Rental in NYC for $2,900 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Crown Heights Rental in NYC for $2,900 - Photo 2
Posted 28 mins ago
Crown Heights, Central Brooklyn, Brooklyn
$2,900
Per Month
By EXR New Development
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Exclusive · No Fee · Elevator
1 Bedroom, Crown Heights Rental in NYC for $2,769 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Crown Heights Rental in NYC for $2,769 - Photo 2
Posted 29 mins ago
Crown Heights, Central Brooklyn, Brooklyn
$2,769
Per Month
By EXR New Development
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Exclusive · No Fee · Elevator · Hardwood Floors
1 Bedroom, Upper East Side Rental in NYC for $5,395 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Upper East Side Rental in NYC for $5,395 - Photo 2
Posted 8 mins ago
Upper East Side, Upper Manhattan, Manhattan
$5,395
Per Month
By Owen L Altidor
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Doorman · Elevator · Pre-War
1 Bedroom, Financial District Rental in NYC for $2,650 - Photo 1
1 Bedroom, Financial District Rental in NYC for $2,650 - Photo 2
Posted 8 mins ago
Financial District, Downtown Manhattan, Manhattan
$2,650
Per Month
By Anna Gorokhovskaya
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No Fee · Doorman · Elevator · Laundry in Unit · Hardwood Floors
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One Bedroom Apartments for Rent

One Bedroom Apartments in NYC

We all dream of living in our own one bedroom apartment in New York City! Decades of classic sitcoms and about Manhattan, from Seinfeld, to Friends, to Sex in the City, portray everyday struggling New Yorkers retreating at the end of each arduous day to their lovely homes. The reality is a bit more tricky. Searching for a one bedroom signals a preference to live alone, away from the craziness of having a roommate, so that everything past the apartment door is yours and yours alone. However, the standard one-bedroom apartment averages over $3,200. Studios provide the same level of privacy at lower cost, but do not have a separate bedroom away from the living room, so the space may be smaller and when guests visit, they will usually see your bed right alongside your couch. Confusing the issue more, there exist apartments advertised as alcove studios, junior one bedrooms, and one bedrooms with a home office. We will quickly review some of those terms here, but we've also written a comprehensive rental guide that will teach you more about the NYC rental process.

Studio versus One Bedoom

What is the difference between a studio and one bedroom apartment? Contrary to popular belief, it has nothing at all to do with the kitchen or bathroom situation. A studio apartment does not contain a legal bedroom, separate from the rest of the unit. Your sleeping area and bed are often in the same exact space as your living room, dining room, foyer, and home office. If you have a legal bedroom separate from the living room, then you have a real, true, one bedroom. Otherwise, you have at best an alcove studio, which is often either an L-shaped apartment where you use the privacy of the nook to carve out a living area that not all your friends will see upon entry. Or, more popular in newer buildings, the floorplan actually makes most of the apartment a nice square shape except for a special alcove large enough to fit a queen size bed and nightstand (or a nice king size bed).

The Department of Buildings in New York has some strict legal definitions of what constitutes a bedroom, but the bar is a bit lower than what we are imagining. Legally, a bedroom MUST contain a window that receives at least a few rays of natural sunlight (the technical definition requires a minimum clearance so you can't build a window into the hallway or straight into a brick wall 2 inches away). The bedroom must be a minimum number of square feet, surrounded by floor to ceiling walls on all sides with an entryway that closes (door, not curtain). The dimensions must fit at least a twin size bed.

OK, from this definition, we can rule out some more creative definitions of a bedroom. If you only have "bookshelf walls", that is there is no wall other than a blockade of IKEA Billy bookshelves, you do not have a one bedoom. Sliding doors qualify as a proper closing entryway, but not a thick curtain. Huge walk-in closets with room for a bed might be more luxurious than many Manhattan housing situations, but without a window to natural light, it is not a bedroom. And yes, the Harry Potter bed underneath the stairwell is no go. In recent years, the Department of Buildings has restricted unit modifications for fire safety reasons, so sometimes these rules work in our favor. You might not be allowed to put up a wall, but a pressurized temporary partition that leaves 12 inches between the ceiling and top of the partition is ok; and it is ok even if you fill that 12 inch gap with frosted windows.

Junior One Bedroom versus One Bedroom

What is the difference between a junior one bedroom and a one bedroom apartment? Ask some New Yorkers and they will consider a junior one bedroom part of some NYC broker conspiracy to advertise studios as real one bedrooms! But there is some actual history behind the mysterious junior one. As mentioned above, the Department of Buildings sets some legal definitions and requirements that must be met to have a room considered a proper bedroom. In almost all cases, the junior one bedroom meets the requirement. However, the original apartment may have been constructed to be a studio or alcove studio. Then, the landlord or previous tenant made some modifications to put up walls to modify the unit into a legal one bedroom.

Should you care whether something is a junior one or real one bedroom? Normally, the pricing will range somewhere in between a studio and one bedroom, and actually the price will skew on the lower end as most studio to junior one conversions occur in older, pre-war buildings with fewer amenities (and fewer restrictions from a previous generation of landlords and regulators). Our advice is to consider both the size of the apartment and the sensibility of the layout. A larger alcove studio might be bigger for the same price, but if the floorplan is so awkward that you have dead spaces everywhere, then you might be wasting some money. Most junior one bedrooms have more efficient floorplans, otherwise the landlord would not have done the conversion. However, the main trade off is often a much smaller living room than a real one bedroom (because half of the original studio's living space went into the newly created bedroom). One last trap, many times a junior one bedroom doesn't strictly meet the legal definition because the walls do not fully rise to the ceiling or the doorway is only covered by a curtain. In these cases, double check with your landlord to see whether you are allowed to plug the gap yourself (or install a door). They may opt to play it safe and require you to reside in the apartment as-is.

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